You’ll come runnin’ back

Time: and a Clock, Eldon Garnet, 1995

Time: and a Clock, 1995
Located: Jimmie Simpson Park, Queen Street East
Artist: Eldon Garnet
Website: https://eldongarnet.com
Contact: eldongarnet@rogers.com
Copyright 2017, Public Art of Toronto. All rights reserved.

tc_map3Continuing east from the Queen and Broadview intersection, we come to the final piece of Eldon Garnet’s massive installation, Time: and a Clock. It is also probably the most unobtrusive of the three works. While you can’t possibly miss the bridge over the Don Valley Parkway, with its clock and LED lights, and the installation at Queen and Broadview is apparent to those of us who walk with our heads down, either to make sure we don’t trip (guilty!) or because we’re staring at our phone, it’s rare that we humans look up as we stroll. As a result, most people don’t notice the series of four stainless steel pennants that line the north side of Queen at Jimmie Simpson Park.

Time: and a Clock, Eldon Garnet, 1995

Time: and a Clock, 1995
Located: Jimmie Simpson Park, Queen Street East
Artist: Eldon Garnet
Website: https://eldongarnet.com
Contact: eldongarnet@rogers.com
Copyright 2017, Public Art of Toronto. All rights reserved.

But that’s all right. Garnet’s work is about the elusiveness of time. His premise is that no matter how we try to measure it, save it, or chart it, we are never going to get a handle on this thing we call time. Like a river, it flows past us and through us. The harder we try to hold on to it, the faster it slips away, much as water drips through our fingers.

Time: and a Clock, Eldon Garnet, 1995

Time: and a Clock, 1995
Located: Jimmie Simpson Park, Queen Street East
Artist: Eldon Garnet
Website: https://eldongarnet.com
Contact: eldongarnet@rogers.com
Copyright 2017, Public Art of Toronto. All rights reserved.

It is the flow that inspires this final piece. Four steel pennants, appearing to blow in a stiff breeze, each containing a single word. These words create a brief poem extolling the nature of time: Coursing, Disappearing, Trembling, Returning. At the top of each mast, there is a single letter. Together they spell out the word T-I-M-E, so the viewer can know exactly Garnet is talking about if they pause to take a moment to think about it.

The title for this installment comes from the immortal Rolling Stones’ tune, Time is On My Side

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